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Level 3 First Aid at Work

This First Aid at Work (FAW) training course will give the participants the training and qualification to the highest level of First Aid, meeting the statutory requirements of the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981.

A range of subjects are covered in this training:

  • Legalities
  • Responsibilities and reporting
  • Heart attacks
  • Dealing with an unresponsive casualty
  • Eye injuries
  • Fractures and spinal injuries
  • Choking
  • Control of bleeding
  • Chest injuries
  • Assessment of the situation
  • Diabetes
  • Shock (including Anaphylaxis)
  • Asthma
  • Head injuries
  • Poisoning
  • Sprains and strains
  • Stroke
  • Burns
  • Epilepsy
  • Resuscitation
  • Bandaging

This qualification lasts for 3 years. To renew, learners will need to sit the Re-Qualification Course, in addition, it is recommended that the learners attend annual refresher courses.

Level 3 Emergency First Aid at Work

Where an organisation’s risk assessment of First Aid needs identifies that there is a requirement for Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW) training, then this national Award in Emergency First Aid at Work satisfies the requirements of the regulatory body for First Aid – the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

All learners will have the skills and knowledge to provide the organisation with an Emergency First Aider. Therefore, they can provide treatment to their casualties in a prompt, safe and effective manner.

A range of subjects are covered including:

  • Responsibilities and reporting
  • Assessment of the situation
  • Dealing with an unresponsive casualty
  • Basic hygiene in First Aid
  • Burns
  • Epilepsy
  • Resuscitation
  • Anatomy
  • Minor injuries
  • Bleeding control
  • Choking
  • Shock

A three year Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work will be issued to the learner, subject to successful assessment, with no external assessors required.

Level 3 Paediatric First Aid

This course is ideal for individuals who are responsible for children and infants, who wish to gain a nationally accredited Level 3 Award.

This two-day training course satisfies the guidelines and criteria as laid down by the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) and Ofsted. In order to obtain this qualification, you must attend both days and complete the two units of accreditation.

A range of subjects are covered including:

  • Responsibilities and reporting
  • Resuscitation
  • Assessment of the situation
  • Fainting
  • Dealing with an unresponsive casualty
  • Choking
  • Head injuries
  • Diabetes
  • Infantile convulsions
  • Foreign bodies
  • Control of bleeding
  • Anaphylaxia
  • Eye injuries
  • Fractures
  • Heat and Cold
  • Asthma
  • Sickle cell anaemia
  • Meningitis
  • Burns
  • Shock

This course has been developed for those who are working with children and infants. It will be of particular interest to teachers, child minders, crèche assistants, playgroup personnel and anyone else who has a responsibility for their welfare whilst in your care.

Level 3 Emergency Paediatric First Aid

This one-day Emergency Paediatric First Aid course has been designed for those who have an interest in child and infant basic life support.

If you have a professional interest, i.e. because you are a child-minder or school teacher, etc, then Ofsted and the Early Years Foundation Stage require you to have 12 hours of paediatric first aid training. Therefore, the 2-Day Level 3 Award in Paediatric First Aid would be required to fulfil their requirements. This 6 hour qualification also makes up the first half of the 12-hour course.

A range of subjects are covered including:

  • Responsibilities and reporting
  • Resuscitation
  • Dealing with an unresponsive casualty
  • Minor injuries
  • Assessment of the situation
  • Epilepsy
  • Wounds and bleeding
  • Anaphylaxia and Shock

Summative practical assessment is ongoing by the instructor, along with a written assessment. A three year Level 3 Award in Emergency Paediatric First Aid will be issued to the learner, subject to successful assessment. No external assessors are required.

Appointed Person Course

When an employer's first-aid needs assessment indicates that a first-aider is unnecessary, the legal minimum requirement is to appoint a person to take charge of first-aid arrangements.

 

The roles of an appointed person are:

  1. Looking after the first-aid equipment
  2. Looking after first aid facilities
  3. Calling the emergency services when required
  4. They can also provide emergency cover, within their role and competence, where a first-aider is absent due to unforeseen circumstances (annual leave does not count).

A certificate of attendance will be issued on completion.

Mini Medics - First Aid for Children

What is Mini Medics?

Mini Medics is a very basic introduction to First Aid and Defibrillation for children. Click on the link below to find out more.

Level 2 Basic Life Support & AED

Automated External Defibrillators (AED’s) are now becoming more common throughout a range of public and work places. A casualty’s survival rate will dramatically increase if an AED is available and if you have appropriately qualified personnel to use it.

This very practical first aid course will enable you to use the AED competently and with confidence. Not only does this course deal with the use of an AED, but it also includes vital training in basic life support including resuscitation.

A range of subjects are covered including:

  • Responsibilities and reporting
  • Assessment of the situation
  • Dealing with an unresponsive casualty
  • Infection control
  • Resuscitation
  • AED functions
  • Defibrillation procedures
  • Safety measures

Level 2 CPR & AED Awareness

This very practical course will enable your learners to use the AED competently and with confidence. Not only does this course deal with the use of an AED but it also includes vital training in resuscitation and choking procedures.

A range of subjects are covered including:

  • Responsibilities and reporting
  • Dealing with an unresponsive casualty
  • Assessment of the situation
  • Paediatric defibrillation
  • Defibrillation procedures
  • Resuscitation
  • Choking
  • Heart attacks
  • AED safety and Functions
  • Infection control

Level 3 Immediate Management of Anaphylaxis

This course is suitable for all First Aiders, with first aid training and healthcare professionals, as well as those in a high risk environment where such medication is available.

At the end of the course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe anaphylaxis
  • Identify triggers for anaphylaxis
  • Describe life threatening problems associated with the Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability (Neurological status), Exposure (Skin and mucosal changes)
  • Explain the need for an early call for help
  • Explain the treatment for anaphylaxis: a) Non re-breather mask b) Removal of trigger c) Auto-injector
  • Identify key features of adrenaline-auto injectors
  • Conduct an initial assessment using the ABCDE approach
  • Demonstrate a recovery position
  • Demonstrate resuscitation for adult and/or child
  • Recognise the need to use an auto-injector
  • Prepare medication for administration during anaphylaxis treatment
  • Demonstrate the safe use of an adrenaline auto-injector using a training device
  • Safely dispose of sharps according to agreed ways of working
  • Handover the casualty to a medical professional

Level 3 Oxygen Therapy Administration (Regulated Course)

This oxygen therapy training enables users to administer oxygen safely and effectively, for casualties with breathing difficulties in emergency situations. Delegates will learn how and when to administer oxygen to a casualty and the safety concerns with carrying, storing and administering oxygen therapy.

This course is suitable for:

  • Qualified First Aiders
  • Emergency First Aiders
  • Dental practitioners and dental care professionals
  • Nurses
  • Healthcare professionals
  • Other individuals working in an environment where oxygen is available for casualty welfare.

At the end of the course, learners will be able to:

  • Explain benefits of oxygen therapy
  • Identify indications for the use of oxygen
  • Explain contraindications prohibiting use of oxygen
  • Explain dangers of using compressed gas
  • Outline health and safety rules for the: a) Use b) Storage c) Handling of oxygen
  • Carry out operational checks in preparation for use
  • Identify when oxygen therapy is required
  • Administer oxygen using the required flow rate for the following oxygen delivery devices: (i) Non re-breather mask (ii) Bag, valve and mask
  • Administer oxygen to a patient in line with agreed ways of working

Level 3 Oxygen Therapy Administration (Non-Regulated Course)

This course enables users to administer oxygen safely and effectively, for residents or patients with breathing difficulties and who have been prescribed Medical Oxygen. Delegates will learn the safety concerns with carrying, storing and administering compressed oxygen to a patient.

This Oxygen Therapy Awareness course is suitable for:

  • Qualified First Aiders
  • Emergency First Aiders
  • Dental practitioners & dental care professionals
  • Nurses
  • Healthcare professionals in Care Homes
  • Social Workers & Social Service providers
  • Healthcare professionals that work in Care in the Community
  • Other individuals working in an environment where compressed oxygen and compressed oxygen cylinders are available for casualty welfare in their normal working day.

The course syllabus contains the following headings:

  • What is Oxygen & Oxygen Therapy
  • Benefits of Oxygen Therapy
  • Indications of Oxygen Therapy
  • Contraindications of Oxygen Therapy
  • Safety when using Oxygen Therapy
  • Dangers of Compressed Gases
  • Storage of Oxygen Cylinders
  • Transport of Oxygen Cylinders
  • Infection Control with Oxygen Therapy
  • How to Use Compressed Oxygen Cylinders
  • Possible Side effects and Other Medicines

At the end of the course, learners will be able to:

  • Explain benefits of oxygen therapy
  • Identify indications for the use of oxygen
  • Explain contraindications prohibiting use of oxygen
  • Explain dangers of using compressed gas
  • Outline health and safety rules for the Use, Storage and Handling of oxygen (including transporting compressed oxygen cylinders)
  • Carry out operational checks in preparation for use of oxygen therapy equipment (including infection control)
  • Identify when oxygen therapy is required and how to use it
  • Administer oxygen with the required flow rate for oxygen equipment
  • Administer oxygen to a patient in line with agreed ways of working

Catastrophic Bleeding Control CPD Course

  • Do you work in a high risk environment e.g. glass or metal handling?
  • Do you work in a sector identified by RIDDOR data as benefiting from training in the use of   tourniquets e.g. construction or forestry?
  • Is there a chance of someone receiving a serious injury/catastrophic bleed?
  • Is there a risk of an attack at your workplace e.g. security or specialist hospitals/care homes?

These are all questions that you should be thinking about when completing your risk assessment, to decide if your workplace requires catastrophic bleed or trauma kits. Requirements for a workplace to have treatment for catastrophic bleeding, including haemostatic dressings or tourniquets, should be based on your first aid needs assessment.

The survival of a casualty following a trauma injury is reliant on fast and effective treatment provided before the arrival of Emergency Services. If there is a chance of someone experiencing a serious bleed or traumatic injury then it is essential to have emergency first aid supplies available to ensure you comply with The Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981.

What is Catastrophic Bleeding?

Catastrophic bleeding is uncontrolled bleeding that will end in the death of the casualty if the bleeding is not managed. Uncontrolled bleeding has been identified as the leading cause of preventable deaths following accidental injury. A catastrophic bleed can be fatal if the casualty loses more than 40% of their blood, unless it is treated and replaced within as little as 3 to 4 minutes.

The European Resuscitation Council New Guidelines

The ERC first aid guidelines are based on a worldwide expert consensus of best practice following an international evidence-based review from the ERC and ILCOR, making them an extremely important addition to first aid practice in Europe.

Key changes listed below:

  • Elevation is no longer recommended for the treatment of bleeding as there is no evidence that this does actually reduce bleeding.
  • Indirect pressure is not recommended as again there is no evidence that this helps control serious bleeding – direct pressure is recommended.
  • Haemostatic dressings and tourniquets are to be used in catastrophic bleeding when direct pressure does not control blood loss. There will need to be specific training to use these and this should be included in specific First Aid courses where the Health and Safety Assessment shows a risk of catastrophic bleeding.
  • Sucking chest wounds should now be left open to the environment and not covered with a dressing, the three sided dressing is no longer recommended as this has been shown to increase the risk of occlusion. Direct pressure should be used to control localised bleeding.

For further information please click on the link below to view The UK Resuscitation Council Guidelines:

What is included in the Catastrophic Bleeding course?

The course will advise on the inherent dangers associated with the use of Tourniquets and Haemostatic Dressings and various types of Airways, whilst administering first aid in a high risk environment for the purpose of saving life.

It has been developed to meet the requirements of industries and businesses that consider themselves to be at high risk following a suitable and sufficient First Aid Needs Assessment. This course will equip the first aider with the necessary skills, knowledge and expertise on how to apply a Tourniquet and Haemostatic dressings and in the event of an emergency.

Airways Management CPD Course

The survival of a casualty following a trauma injury is reliant on fast and effective treatment provided before the arrival of Emergency Services. If there is a chance of someone experiencing trouble in breathing and maintaining an effective airway, then it is essential to have emergency first aid supplies available to ensure you comply with The Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981.

What is Airways Management?

During a cardiac arrest, it is very important to maintain high quality chest compressions with minimal interruption for airway interventions. It is important to ensure first aiders are properly trained in Immediate Management of Airways.

In practice, several airway interventions (e.g. no airway interventions, mouth-to-mouth, Bag-Valve-Mask, supraglottic airway) and devices are used in a stepwise manner during CPR and after ROSC. Rescuers should use the skills in which they are proficient. Training in stepwise airway care provides a progressive approach to obtaining and maintaining an open airway, adequate oxygenation and ventilation to aid the aims of first aid.

The European Resuscitation Council New Guidelines

The ERC first aid guidelines are based on a worldwide expert consensus of best practice following an international evidence-based review from the ERC and ILCOR, making them an extremely important addition to first aid practice in Europe.

Key changes listed below:

  • During CPR the pause in chest compressions to insert an advanced airway (tracheal tube or supraglottic airway) should be less than 5 seconds.
  •  In practice, several airway interventions (e.g. no airway interventions, mouth-to-mouth, bag-mask, supraglottic airway, tracheal intubation) and devices are used in a stepwise manner during CPR and after ROSC.
  • Rescuers should use the skills in which they are proficient. Stepwise airway care provides a progressive approach to obtaining and maintaining an open airway and adequate oxygenation and ventilation.

For further information please click on the link below to view The UK Resuscitation Council Guidelines:

What is included in the Airways Management CPD course?

  • Recap on the respiratory system
  • How to aid airway obstruction (including suction)
  • Aspirate: immediate dangers associated with suction
  • Priorities of the airway ladder
  • Recap on how to use OP, NPA airways and Supraglottic Airway Devices (SAD).

How to Book...

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